How to Deal with Experiential Account & Staffing Managers

Jae Davis Experiential Staffing ManagersBeing late to respond to texts, rude, inexperienced, or just downright unprofessional, these are just a few of the phrases I commonly hear from fellow EXPs describing their dealings with account and staffing managers of Experiential Marketing and staffing agencies. So as an EXP, how do you handle a lack of professionalism? And what are some parameters you can put in place to ensure that everyone is happy and that event goals are achieved? Check out my YouTube video or continue reading below for a few tips to keep in mind as an EXP.

Put Everything in Writing

The days of taking someone’s word and trusting that they will follow through on any promises are out the window. As an EXP, if you encounter any issues prior to or during an event, be sure to write an email that addresses any and all concerns. When writing your email, make sure that you address the issues at hand, and if possible, provide viable solutions to solve any issues. As an EXP, especially one executing tours, you will have to maintain open communication lines with any account managers. Therefore, having any details in writing will serve as a point of reference for both of you. So while it may seem like a pain to write that email when you’re tired, and although you may not want to, go ahead and do it while it’s fresh in your mind. Trust me. It’ll save you time and, in some cases, unnecessary stress later.

Communicate Effectively

As an EXP, there is no such thing as too many details or over communicating. If you are having issues with an event, contact, or another EXP, take the time to communicate your concerns. Oftentimes, EXPs may not communicate for fear of losing a position or opportunity. But if something isn’t right, speak up. How do you do so effectively? Well, for one, going 0-100 and reacting out of anger and frustration is a BIG NO. Instead, take a few minutes to calm down and reassess the situation. It is also important to respond to any issues in a professional manner. Remember that everyone receives and processes information differently. So while you may think that you conveyed key information in a clear manner verbally, it may not have been clearly understood by the person receiving it. Here’s an example: If you’re a tour manager executing an event that begins at 3 p.m., the account manager may assume that you will arrive at least an hour early to set up, and he will plan accordingly. However, if you have been executing the same program for months on end and have an efficient system, then you may be able to arrive only 30 minutes early. Communicating this beforehand will ensure that both parties are on the same page.

Patience is Key

This rule is important, especially when you’re dealing with account managers who have little to no experience in the experiential marketing industry. When dealing with this type of EXP, it could be hard to communicate any issues on-site and explain why you have asked for certain event details because in their mind it may not make sense. Seasoned EXPs know what I’m talking about. This may create a sense of double duty and force you to be both the EXP and the account manager even though you’re being paid for just the one job. In this case, having patience and working with the account manager to convey your concerns and communicate what’s needed is important. If you feel as though this is still not working, then you should try to speak to another account manager. Remember to CYA and document all issues.

When dealing with account managers as an EXP, there are times when you want to scream, and there are joyous moments when you appreciate someone who understands your struggles as a tour manager or brand ambassador executing an event. I have provided a quick checklist for you to download that has my top tips to keep in mind when working with any account or staffing manager.

YouTube

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